The Day We Lost Afghanistan

The National Interest September 19, 2012 Afghanistan has been unwinnable has been obvious to most outside analysts since well before the so-called surge of 2009. Now, the United States government has finally admitted the obvious in deeds if not words. Following the  murder of six NATO troops in yet another “green on blue” attack in which Afghan…

Oversight or Not, Drones Are Here to Stay

World Politics Review July 27, 2012 In “The Imperial Presidency: Drone Power and Congressional Oversight,” Michael Cohen argues persuasively that the U.S. Congress has abdicated its constitutional and statutory responsibility to reign in the executive branch in matters of national security policy. Then again, few who have been paying attention this past decade — some…

Panoptic War

TCS Daily June 8, 2006 Editor’s Note:  Terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi has been killed.  Images of Zarqawi’s face are making the rounds as you read this, reinforcing many of Dr. Joyner’s assertions below. The war in Iraq has had powerful images from the beginning and public perceptions of the war have shifted along with the prevailing images. The…

Give Civil War a Chance

TCS Daily February 27, 2006 Blogger and TCS contributor Stephen Green argues that civil war in Iraq might not be such a bad thing, noting that, “A civil war is the nastiest way to get a good result.” He cites several examples, notably the Thirty Years War, the English Civil War, and the American war between the…

The State of the Enemy

TCS Daily January 30, 2006 As President Bush prepares to give his annual address on the State of the Union (I predict it will be “strong”) it is time to reflect on the state of our enemy. Daniel Benjamin and Steven Simon argue in a New York Times op-ed that al Qaeda is still quite strong, mostly because…

Civil War Enthusiasts

Tech Central Station December 1, 2004 The writer Matthew Yglesias makes a bold assertion in The American Prospect magazine: For months now, skeptics of George W. Bush’s Iraq policy have been warning that the present path could lead to bloody civil war. More recently, proponents of continued U.S. military presence have been warning that bloody civil war would be…

The Dragon Stirs

Tech Central Station August 2, 2004 For the decade after the Cold War, the United States military strategy was built around a scenario involving two nearly simultaneous major regional conflicts with Iraq and North Korea. Much derided by analysts throughout that period, the doctrine was formally abandoned with the September 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review. Ironically, the…

Iraq and Jihadist Terrorists: A Review Essay

Strategic Insights, Volume III, Issue 7 (July 2004) Over the last month, there has been renewed debate as to the validity of arguments used by the Bush Administration to justify the invasion of Iraq to topple Saddam Hussein’s regime. Most of the discussion has focused on the extent of Saddam’s ties to Osama bin Laden’s…

Bouncing the Security Check

Tech Central Station June 1, 2004 The massive hiring in the security sector in the aftermath of the 9-11 attacks has left us with a huge backlog of people waiting for federal security clearances. A recent General Accounting Office report estimated the total at 360,000 — including 188,000 civilian contractors for the Defense Department alone. The average…